Monthly Archives: February 2016

Appropriate Technology – Appropriate Methodology

Well, things churn, and a turn of events has my ire up – This something measurable as more than “a little”, something beyond a bit more than can’t push it aside, all the same, let’s describe my ire, as up, just a bit…

Many regulars among the readership will be aware that my intent, my work here on the Bridgewright Blog is as much about advocating for preservation of this “Trade” as much as it is an advocacy for the preservation of the historic bridges that are the fruit borne of that tree.

I am a practitioner of two allied trades, Timber framing and Bridgewrighting. Both, seemingly superseded, were briefly lost. In the but generation plus period of time in which both trades had fallen out of practice, (I have spoken to this in prior entries, this perhaps best articulated in Living Memory – And the reasoning as to why best described in Meritocracy) much was lost.

In both instances, in their long running period of practice, too little of the everyday was written down. Though there are some few notable exceptions on the timberframing side, with little of practice preserved in the written record, this break in the chain of day to day practice, of lifelong practitioners passing down the intricacies and the nuances of the everyday to an up and coming body of Apprentices – Much, much too much, was lost.

It is not an ability to look at and understand a patent truss drawing that makes a timber savvy carpenter a Bridgewright. Bridgewrighting is only an allied trade, there are subtle though highly important differences in approach in building long-span trusses. A full understanding of these subtleties being born only of the almost unspoken day to day understandings found in a lifetime of practice, or years in working alongside someone who already possesses a lifetime of doing and has a willingness to share all they know.

All of this of the sense of last months entry, that it is with a simple line that it all begins, that such is the key in unraveling and unwinding the secrets of timber. Of how full hard up full bearing in every joint cut and how to get there is the not so secret of how a knowing carpenter gets a truss to hold its intended geometry. And this continues with an understanding of the material with which we work, with which species is appropriate to the task at hand, with how center, pith and balance and the presence of sapwood effects how any given piece will behave as it seasons, and how that understanding is (or should be) what drives every decision as to how any given piece should be oriented in bridge truss framing and might be used to its greatest potential advantage.

Winding Sticks

Two Framing Squares used as Winding sticks – A black Eagle backed up by a Horizon Board is seen riding the mid-length Level Mark in the distance stands in contrast to the stainless Square in the foreground allowing for adjustment and compensation for both bow & wind in the pinging of snapline Datums

Much was lost, and much of that, with practice and research and perseverance, has been recovered…

Though it is only with regular opportunity for the practice of these skills, and the conveyance of the understandings and nuances that are the bedrock of those skillsets from today’s practicing craftsmen to a coming generation, that there lies any opportunity to pass on either to an up and coming group of practitioners.

And here is where my ire lies, with near miss opportunities lost. And opportunities ill spent.

A new covered wooden though truss was recently constructed, though it was of the dumbed down bolted together type now growing in commonality. It holds no passion, its construction requiring no specialized skills or knowledge base, and so sadly, holds no promise of sharing any. Though this truss was launched with the low tech promise that holds the possibility to share how simple rigging allows the moving of large objects with surprising simplicity and ease. That promise was buried in needless complexity, and even were there the opportunity to relay simple rigging wisdom, it is doubtful that anyone with a passion for this trade was there to receive it.

Un-Stayed Gin

Though requiring now uncommon know-how, time proven Appropriate Technologies are often the most cost effective way to make things done

And sadder still, and none so far from that opportunity lost, an 18th Century bridge rehabilitated but a decade ago and said to now have a full foot of “sag” has just been awarded to a second low bidder – And somehow no mention is made of poorly designed repairs equally poorly executed by people in both instances who had little sense of what they were doing. Instead it is intimated in the announcement, that old wooden bridges, of their own accord, just up and go haywire.

Without either neglect (a lack of routine maintenance to siding and roofing and the removal of dirt and leaf litter from the bridge and its underpinnings) or poorly executed interventions, the time proven service lives of these structures more than suggests that such could not be farther from the truth.

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